Archive for category Fishing

TU Opposes House of Representative Appropriations Bill

Trout Unlimited (TU) strongly opposes the appropriations bill for Interior, Environment and Related Agencies passed Thursday by a subcommittee of the U.S. House of Representatives. The bill cuts funding for essential conservation programs like the Land and Water Conservation Fund and North American Wetlands Conservation Act, and contains harmful riders that undermine the Clean Water Act and other protective rules for rivers and streams.

“Fishing and hunting generate $76.7 billion annually in economic activity in the U.S.,” said Steve Moyer, VP for Government Affairs at Trout Unlimited. “We can’t expect to sustain this powerful economic engine if we’re removing the very conservation programs that make it run.”

The bill contains numerous harmful legislative riders, including attachments that will:

Stop the Army Corps of Engineers and EPA from finalizing guidance or conducting a rulemaking to restore Clean Water Act protection for some wetlands and streams which were curtailed by two harmful and confusing Supreme Court decisions (Rapanos in 2006 and SWANCC in 2001).

Discontinue rulemaking processes designed to protect streams from mountaintop removal mining.

Block the Interior Department’s protection of 1 million acres of federal lands near Grand Canyon National Park from new hard rock mining.

Delay EPA action on post-construction stormwater controls. Stormwater runoff from impervious surfaces can result in the elimination of natural filtration, scouring of rivers and streams, increased pollutant load discharges, and degradation of the physical integrity of aquatic habitats, stream function, and overall water quality.

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Ozarks Fishin’ Report June 10, 2011

TABLE ROCK: Crawdads-Crawdads-Crawdads!

(James River arm): 71 degrees, high, dingy; black bass good, largemouth and spotted bass being caught on Carolina rigged plastic worms in flooded timber, best colors are plum, purple, peanut butter and jelly, and watermelon, flipping green or brown jigs up into flooded timber is working as well as soft plastic crayfish; catfish good on limb line or trotline using 2″ to 3″ bluegill or goldfish, also try pole and line with yellow fins, creek chubs, nightcrawlers, stinkbaits, and cut baits; all other species slow.

James River (lower): 76 degrees, normal, clear; goggle-eye good on black/white skirted spinners and black/white jigs and minnows; black bass good on nightcrawlers and crankbaits at morning and dusk; smallmouth bass good on nightcrawlers and crayfish colored crankbaits at morning and dusk; catfish good on cut baits and nightcrawlers using trotlines and limb lines; crappie fair on jigs and minnows.

(main lake): 71 degrees, high, dingy; black bass good, largemouth and spotted bass being caught on Carolina rigged plastic worms in flooded timber, best colors are plum, purple, peanut butter and jelly, and watermelon, flipping green or brown jigs up into flooded timber is working as well as soft plastic crayfish; catfish good on limb line or trotline using 2″ to 3″ bluegill or goldfish, also try pole and line with yellow fins, creek chubs, nightcrawlers, stinkbaits, and cut baits; white bass fair on topwater lures or shallow diving lures, try bright colors in the evening; all other species slow.

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BULL SHOALS: 68-72 degrees, high, dingy; Dam/Swan Creek area: black bass good on jigs, soft plastics, and nightcrawlers; walleye fair on jerkbait; white bass fair on swimming minnows; Beaver Creek area: black bass good on jigs, soft plastics and nightcrawlers.

STOCKTON: 75 degrees, high, clear; black bass good on jigs and spinnerbaits in coves and flooded brush; catfish good on nightcrawlers and shrimp; walleye good on points with nightcrawlers, jigs and crankbaits in 20′ of water; crappie slow, best on crankbaits while trolling in 12′ to 15′ of water.

POMME DE TERRE: 84 degrees, high, clear; crappie good on minnows in 15′ to 30′ of water over structure; black bass good on plastic baits along main lake points in early morning; walleye good while trolling flats with crankbaits or drifting nightcrawlers; catfish good on live bait using trotlines or jug lines; muskie slow, best while trolling flats with crankbaits; white bass slow.

TRUMAN: 79 degrees, high, dingy; crappie good using jigs and minnows; black bass good using spinnerbaits and jigs; catfish fair using cut bait or shad; white bass and hybrid bass fair using jigs.

LAKE OF THE OZARKS: (Osage): 81 degrees, dingy; black bass fair on dark colored soft plastics, crankbaits and buzzbaits; white bass slow, try light colored soft plastics; crappie fair on minnows and crappie jigs; catfish good using cut baits and stinkbaits.

Lake of the Ozarks (Niangua): 81 degrees, muddy; black bass fair on dark colored soft plastics, crankbaits and buzzbaits; white bass slow, try light colored soft plastics; crappie fair on minnows and crappie jigs; catfish good using cut baits and stinkbaits.

Lake of the Ozarks (Glaize): 81 degrees, dingy; black bass fair on dark colored soft plastics, crankbaits and buzzbaits; white bass slow, try light colored soft plastics; crappie fair on minnows and crappie jigs; catfish good using cut baits and stinkbaits.

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Sportsmans Factory Outlet was founded to be your outdoor gear headquarters. We will save you money on the equipment you need! Our buying expertise and more than 100 years of combined outdoor industry knowledge combine to bring you a wide selection of proven fishing, marine, hunting, and other outdoor sporting products at unbelievable prices. We offer quality outdoor sporting gear from the world’s top outdoor brands at the very best prices possible. Our selection includes proven fishing, marine, hunting and other outdoor sporting products as well as factory special buys, closeouts, and reconditioned items. All of our products are backed by our “Iron Clad” money-back guarantee which means that you can order with confidence – Because we’re sportsman too, and we know how much you depend on your gear. Shop with confidence. If you ever have a question about our products or services, feel free to contact us at info@sportsmansfactoryoutlet.com. And be sure to check back often as our selection changes daily – and great deals don’t last long!

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Ozarks Fishin’ Report June 3, 2011

TABLE ROCK: (James River arm): 70 degrees, high, dingy; black bass good on white or white/chartreuse spinnerbaits, also try gray or white grubs on a 1/22 oz. jig; Carolina rigging plastic worms is also producing bites on plum, purple, motor oil or watermelon colored baits; catfish good on pole and line using Yellow Fins, creek chubs, nightcrawlers, stinkbaits and cut bait, trotlines also working well; smallmouth bass good on white or shad colored Super Flukes or Slug-Go; all other species slow.

(main lake): 70 degrees, high, dingy; black bass good on white or white/chartreuse spinnerbaits, also try gray or white grubs on a 1/2 oz. jig; Carolina rigging plastic worms is also producing bites on plum, purple, motor oil or watermelon colored baits; catfish good on pole and line using Yellow Fins, creek chubs, nightcrawlers, stinkbaits and cut bait, trotlines also working well; all other species slow.

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BULL SHOALS: 68-70 degrees, high, dingy,   Tucker Hollow Marina reports:  Dam/Swan Creek area, black bass good on jigs and nightcrawlers; walleye good on jigs and nightcrawlers; Beaver Creek area, black bass good on jigs, soft plastics and nightcrawlers; all other species slow..

STOCKTON: 65 degrees, high, clear; black bass good on crankbaits off banks in 12′ of water and Texas rigged in 8′ of water; catfish good on nightcrawlers and shrimp; crappie slow, best with tube jigs near the bank in brush piles; all other species slow.

POMME DE TERRE: 71 degrees, water level is 7′ high, upper stretches dingy with lower portion of the lake clear; largemouth bass good on plastic baits in submerged vegetation around shore; catfish good on limb lines, trotlines and pole and line using hotdogs, cut shad, and live bait; crappie fair on minnows or jigs over deep structure in 15′ to 20′ of water; all other species fair.

TRUMAN: 70 degrees, high, dingy; crappie fair using jigs and minnows; black bass fair using spinnerbaits and jigs; catfish fair using cut bait or shad; white bass and hybrid bass fair using jigs.

LAKE OF THE OZARKS: Lake of the Ozarks (Niangua): 72 degrees, muddy; crappie slow, try minnows; white bass fair on spinners; black bass slow, try plastic worms; catfish fair using cut shad.

Lake of the Ozarks (Osage): 72 degrees, dingy; black bass fair on dark colored soft plastics and buzzbaits; white bass slow, try light colored soft plastics and Rooster Tails; crappie fair on minnows and crappie jigs; catfish good using worms, cut baits and stinkbaits.

NORFORK: 72 degrees, high, dingy; all species slow.

Need the right tackle?


About Sportsmans Factory Outlet

Sportsmans Factory Outlet was founded to be your outdoor gear headquarters. We will save you money on the equipment you need! Our buying expertise and more than 100 years of combined outdoor industry knowledge combine to bring you a wide selection of proven fishing, marine, hunting, and other outdoor sporting products at unbelievable prices. We offer quality outdoor sporting gear from the world’s top outdoor brands at the very best prices possible. Our selection includes proven fishing, marine, hunting and other outdoor sporting products as well as factory special buys, closeouts, and reconditioned items. All of our products are backed by our “Iron Clad” money-back guarantee which means that you can order with confidence – Because we’re sportsman too, and we know how much you depend on your gear. Shop with confidence. If you ever have a question about our products or services, feel free to contact us at info@sportsmansfactoryoutlet.com. And be sure to check back often as our selection changes daily – and great deals don’t last long!

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MDC fish hatchery uses diverse trout species to control parasites

The Missouri Department of Conservation’s (MDC) Maramec Spring Fish Hatchery is protecting its trout with more trout. The hatchery, which raises rainbow trout, is trying a new way of preventing parasitic infestation using brook trout.

"Courtesy Missouri Department of Conservation"

Rainbow trout, along with several other west-coast fish species, are susceptible to a parasitic copepod called Salmincola californiensis. The tiny, shrimplike parasites, which are about the size of a pencil eraser, attach to fishes’ gills, where they leave eggs and complete their life cycle.

While the copepods are not a problem in the wild, they can become prolific in hatcheries that raise fish in high-density conditions. The copepods can attach in such high numbers that they weaken the fish, making them more prone to disease, and even causing the fish to suffocate.

According to Maramec Spring Fish Hatchery Manager Wes Swee, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration currently does not recognize any chemical treatments to control parasitic copepods.

A study at a California hatchery concluded that placing brook trout upstream from rainbow trout somehow filters copepod larvae from the water supply, reducing infestation. The reason for this is undetermined. Swee said one theory is that copepod larvae are specific to certain west-coast fishes and cannot complete their life cycle on other species, such as east-coast-native brook trout. According to Swee, the copepods attach to brook trout but do not produce eggs as they do on rainbow trout.

To test the theory on Missouri trout, the MDC is raising a small number of brook trout at Maramec Spring Fish Hatchery. In June the trout will be put in one pool above a pool of copepod-free rainbow trout from another hatchery. If successful, brook trout could be an effective biological control method for managing parasitic copepods in fish hatcheries.

Biological control methods are not a new concept. In fact, they are preferable when a food product like fish is involved. A comparable biological control method is the use of ladybugs to reduce aphid infestation in gardens.

“Using a biological pest control is better than using chemicals that may affect the safety of a food item such as fish,” Swee said.

Although the copepods themselves do not affect a fish’s food quality, protecting hatchery-raised rainbow trout from parasites is an effort to ensure the quality of Missouri’s trout fishing.

“Controlling the copepods will allow us to continue to stock healthy fish for the public,” Swee said. “The long-term goal is to provide Missouri anglers with healthy, more vigorous and more attractive rainbow trout that will put up a good fight for fishermen.”

Rainbow trout is the species most commonly stocked by MDC to provide trout fishing opportunities in designated Missouri waters. A limited number of brown trout, produced in MDC hatcheries, are also stocked in selected waters each year.

“There are no plans to release the brook trout into Missouri waters,” Swee said.

For more information on Maramec Spring Trout Park visit www.MissouriConservation.org and search “Maramec Spring Trout Park.” For information on Missouri’s other fish hatcheries, search “Fish Hatcheries and Trout Parks.”

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Tagged bass can hook you some cash!

he Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) is tagging 1,600 legal-sized smallmouth bass on five rivers in southern Missouri as part of a research project. Anglers who catch tagged bass can earn $25 or $75 by reporting their catches to MDC researchers.

MDC biologists are tagging smallmouth bass in the Black River, Castor River, Courtois Creek, Current River and the North Fork of the White River, and will continue tagging during the spring season over the next two years.

According to Fisheries Management Biologist John Ackerson, these types of research studies have been successful with other fish species such as catfish and walleye.

“The research project will help biologists learn more about angler catch rates and fish movement in these rivers,” Ackerson said. “Information gained from anglers reporting their tagged catches will help us manage this species, which many Missourians love to fish.”

He explained that tagged bass do not have to be kept to receive a reward. Anglers may just remove the tag and release the fish. Tags must be returned to the MDC to receive a reward.

To report tagged catches, anglers must call the phone number listed on the tag and provide the following information:

• Tag number

• If the fish was kept or released

• Date of catch

• Total length of fish

• Approximate location of catch

For more information on the research project, contact Ackerson at 471-255-9561, extension 275, or John.Ackerson@mdc.mo.gov.

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Eagle Claw® Goes Green with bioline®

Rod and reel anglers of all kinds are connected by a common thread, literally, in that they rely on fishing line as their link between man and fish. Nylon monofilament, ever since first coming on the fishing scene in the mid-1930s, has grown to become the predominant line type of choice because of its affordability, strength and durability.

In fact, monofilament line is so durable that scientists say it can remain in the environment for as long as 600 years. With that said, there’s probably not a fisherman out there who hasn’t lost a fish or a favorite lure because of having become entangled in old fishing line snags underwater. The reality is that our country’s 30 million anglers, age 16 and older, who spend an average of 17 days per year fishing, use a lot of fishing line.

Fortunately, leaders in the recreational fishing industry have always been the ones to keep the environment and tomorrow’s anglers in mind, and that is exactly why Eagle Claw® Fishing Tackle Co. proudly offers bioline®, a true 100 percent biodegradable premium fishing line that was born from the medical industry. Bioline is engineered to retain its strength and durability for 10-12 months of use, and then completely degrade in water or on land within five years.

“Bioline has all of the performance properties of monofilament – outstanding abrasion and knot strength, and the clarity of fluorocarbon – but is highly more environment friendly,” said Chris Russell, Marketing Director at Wright & McGill Co. “Fishermen themselves have always been this sport’s greatest advocates for doing the right thing to pass forward the legacy of fishing, and fishermen really ‘get it’ as to why biodegradable fishing line is a big deal.”

Bioline is made from a special formula of biodegradable polymers, resulting in the earth-friendly alternative to nylon because it does breakdown so much faster to become a simple combination of carbon dioxide (CO2), water (H2O) and biomass. The degradation process starts at the surface of the line, with microorganisms breaking down and digesting bioline with the aid of sunlight and moisture.

Bioline begins to lose its tensile strength in 10-12 months of use. As its tensile strength deteriorates, it becomes much less a nuisance to all who enjoy the aquatic environment, including wildlife and anglers.

Of all anglers, crappie fishermen in particular especially benefit from biodegradable fishing line because they spend the majority of their pursuit of the species in and around cover, especially submerged wood. Hardwood brushpiles can provide good crappie habitat for years and years, but the most popular ones can end up a mess through an accumulation of snagged and broken-off lines over time.

“Without a doubt, old fishing line in the water is our number one nuisance in how a lot of us fish for the big slabs here in Mississippi,” said crappie guide Bo Hudson of Jackson. “When we’re long-line trolling over or near brush with several lines out, it can get ugly in a hurry upon encountering snagged lines down there. Who wouldn’t want biodegradable fishing lines to become the standard for our sport?”

Mike Taylor, a fishing guide from Okmulgee, Okla., shared similar thoughts. “I have favorite brushpiles I have to avoid with my novice-angling clients because they get hung up so bad on all the previous break-offs down there,” he said. “It’s a lot easier to get a lure, hook or fish free from a branch or stump than it is from snarled fishing line. I love the thought of my brushpiles being self-cleaning through use of bioline.”

Another reason bioline is a natural for crappie anglers is because of available line sizes and filler spool capacities. Bioline comes in 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12 lb. test, and each size is sold on a spool containing 225 yards. As a general rule, crappie reels are small and hold less than 100 yards of line, meaning a spool of bioline is good for two or three fill-ups. Bioline retails for around $11.99 per spool.

Bioline packaging is engineered to be air and water tight for use in storing the unused portion in between refills. It is recommended the package be kept in a cool and dry place.

“Today’s reels perform best with fresh line and their spools filled to the maximum level, so anglers in-the-know are already changing their line on a frequent basis throughout the season,” said Russell. “Since we guarantee bioline to retain 100 percent of its strength for the average use of 10 months, this Eagle Claw product is the perfect answer for anglers interested in doing their part for the environment. Bioline is a first-class line and worthy of consideration for any angler and all kinds of fishing.”

Eagle Claw got its start in the late 1920s and has always been a leader in innovative, environmentally friendly products that serve the present needs of current anglers while also preserving the planet for future generations to enjoy. In addition to bioline, other “Fish Green®” products in the Eagle Claw lineup include non-lead weights and sinkers, circle hooks, barbless hooks and degradable packaging.

For more information about Eagle Claw bioline, visit www.biolinefishing.com. For more information about Eagle Claw, visit www.eagleclaw.com.

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Kansas’ Jeffery Energy Center Lake Zebra Mussel Victim

The Kansas Department of Wildlife and Parks (KDWP) has confirmed the presence of zebra mussels in the Jeffery Energy Center Make-Up Lake, 6 miles east of St. Marys. KDWP fisheries biologist Ely Sprenkle was checking his zebra mussel monitoring devices the week of May 23 when he discovered three small zebra mussels attached to the PVC sampler.

“The discovery of a newly infested lake is always a difficult thing,” said Jason Goeckler, aquatic nuisance specialist for KDWP, “but in this case, staff was prepared for the discovery. Upstream infestations at Milford and Wilson reservoirs guaranteed spread because Jeffery Energy Center make-up water comes directly from the Kansas River. This brings the total number of zebra mussel infested lakes in Kansas to 11. We anticipate three more lakes to be added to the list later this summer because they are downstream of known infestations.”

Three simple steps – clean, drain, and dry – can help prevent the spread of mussels. Anglers and boaters must take these precautions to avoid transporting mussels from infested lakes to other waters:

never move fish or water from one body of water to another;
empty bait buckets on dry land, not into lakes;
inspect boats, trailers, skis, anchors, and all other equipment and remove any visible organisms and vegetation; and
wash equipment and boat with hot (140-degree) water or dry for at least five days to remove or kill species that are not visible.

Zebra mussels are native to the Black and Caspian Sea in Europe and were introduced to the Great Lakes from the ballasts of ships in the1980s. They have now been confirmed in seven Kansas waters, beginning with El Dorado in 2003. Others include Cheney, Winfield City Lake, Marion, Perry, and Lake Afton. Zebra mussels are a problem because they filter water, up to a liter a day, to eat plankton. Although this filtering action may clear up the water, clear water does NOT mean clean water and the clear water zebra mussels leave behind will often lead to algal blooms that are harmful to people. The clear water can also let UV rays damage fish eggs laid during the spawn. Larval fish and native mussels rely on this same plankton to survive. Zebra mussels also clog pipes by forming colonies inside of the pipes. Nationwide expenditures to control zebra mussels in electric generating plants are estimated at $145 million/year. In addition, zebra mussels also have sharp shells that cut the unprotected skin of people and pets.

If an individual is caught transporting live zebra mussels in Kansas, they may face up to six months in jail and fines up to $5,000. More information on zebra mussels and strategies to contain their spread, including an instructive video, is available at the KDWP website, http://www.kdwp.state.ks.us. Click “Fishing/Aquatic Nuisance Species” and then click on the picture of the zebra mussel.

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